The Nassau Community College Spring 2010 Cultural Program Presents Native American Culture: Paying Respect to the Natural World Author and Wilderness Expert James Bruchac April 12

NEWS RELEASE

Immediate: March 9, 2010Media Contact: Alicia Steger 516.572.9634E-Mail: alicia.steger@ncc.eduncc.edu/newsreleases  

 

The Nassau Community College Spring 2010 Cultural Program Presents Native American Culture:  Paying Respect to the Natural World Author and Wilderness Expert James Bruchac

  April 12

Garden City, NY - The Spring 2010 Cultural Program at Nassau Community College is proud to present Native American Culture: Paying Respect to the Natural World, which will take place on Monday, April 12 at 11:00 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. in the College Center Building. During his presentation, James Bruchac will explain the relationship of Native American Iroquoian and Algonquin traditions, stories and spirituality to their natural environment.

James Bruchac is an award-winning author, storyteller, tracking expert and wilderness guide. Raised in the Adirondack foothills town of Greenfield Center, New York, he is the son of world-renowned Abenaki Indian storyteller and author Joseph Bruchac III. Of Abenaki and Slovak descent, James Bruchac grew up immersed in the outdoors and the art of storytelling. For the past 20 years, he has shared stories at hundreds of schools, libraries, museums and festivals across the country.

Bruchac has authored and co-authored Native American and nature related books for children and adults. Among his books for children are "How the Chipmunk Got His Stripes", "The Girl Who Helped Thunder" and "Native American Games and Stories". Books written for adults by Bruchac include three animal tracking pocket guides. Due to their combined efforts to educate people about the natural world, Bruchac and his father were awarded a conservation achievement award from the National Wildlife Federation in 2005. In addition, he and members of his family were featured on the PBS special "Adirondack Storytellers". In 2006, Bruchac founded The Saratoga Native American Festival, bringing together hundreds of Native dancers, storytellers and cultural educators.

As a tracker, Bruchac has worked with many organizations, including the U.S. government, the National Parks Service and the National Wildlife Federation. For the last ten years, he has also been the director of and a tracker for the Ndakinna Education Center.

For more information about Native American Culture: Paying Respect to the Natural World, which is free, open to the public and accessible to the disabled, call 516.572.7153.

 

About Nassau Community CollegeNassau Community College, a division of the State University of New York, is an institution where over 23,000 full- and part-time students and nearly 15,000 continuing and professional students start and continue their successful journey through higher education. More than 60 fields of study are offered on a 225-acre campus located in the center of Long Island. As the largest single-campus two-year college in New York State, Nassau Community College maintains a national reputation for excellence. For more information, visit www.ncc.edu.

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